Tag Archive for 'low-carb'

Lose weight faster with NuPhedrine

NuPhedrine offers you two weight loss ingredients in one non-prescription pill. It contains the patented Advantra-Z in the extra strength concentration, combined with Hoodia Gordonii in the most potent form available. The combination of these two ingredients helps you lose weight much faster by increasing your metabolism to burn up more calories even when you are resting and suppressing your appetite. Since Advantra-Z is a stimulant, you will also notice an increase in energy. NuPhedrine can be taken with any nutritional plan you are on, irrespective of whether it is low gi, low in fat, low in carbs, or calorie restricted. It should work with all of them. But, if you intend to buy NuPhedrine to help you lose weight, please read this article first and make an informed decision.

A review of NuPhedrine will be incomplete without a reference to the history of one of the ingredients in Nuphedrine, namely Advantra-Z. Advantra-Z is a patented form of synephrine, or “bitter orange”, which is a stimulant related to ephedra. In the early 1990’s Ephedra (Ma Huang), in combination with Caffeine and Aspirin gained widespread popularity as a performance enhancer, energy booster, appetite suppressor and weight loss aid. This combination of drugs was known as the E.C.A stack. Ephedra not only boosts the metabolism, it also increases body heat and as such can be regarded as a thermogenic drug. It was reported that, with caffeine, ephedra can help people lose 5 to 10 percent of their body weight.
Continue reading ‘Lose weight faster with NuPhedrine’

Share this Article

Review of the South Beach Diet

The South Beach diet was developed by a practicing cardiologist, Dr. Arthur Agatston. Dr Agatston did not initially set out to develop a weight-loss plan. He simply got frustrated when his patients, when following the standard, low-fat American Heart Association diet, failed to lose weight or improve their blood chemistry. He then developed a new diet specifically for his patients, which later became the basis for The South Beach Diet, an international best seller. The South Beach Diet was first published in April 2003 and has been on the New York Times best seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks, with more than 8.5 million copies in print. It was #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list for 38 weeks.

The diet is formulated on the premise that many of us are addicted to carbohydrate foods. Many experts commented that the South Beach diet is really just a revised version of the Atkins Diet. Both of these diets kick off with a first stage designed to get rid of addiction to high levels of carbohydrate consumption. The South Beach diet varies from Atkins in that it consists of three instead of four phases. While the first and last phases of both diets are very similar, the middle two phases of the Atkins Diet has been replaced by a single stage in the South Beach Diet. As result of this difference the typical rate at which South Beach followers lose weight is lower than that of Atkins followers, but fans claim that the South Beach diet is easier to stick to since it offers greater variety at an earlier stage in the diet.

The South Beach Diet is introduced as a balanced weight-loss and maintenance plan that encourages people to eat a variety of foods, such as lean sources of protein, reduced fat cheeses and dairy products, legumes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and good fats like olive and canola oil.  Snacking is encouraged along with approved sweet treats and desserts on a daily basis. The glycemic index (is a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their effect on blood sugar) plays a critical role in the diet, as it forms the basis for Agatston’s advice on how to choose the best carbohydrates to accompany a meal. The concept of the glycemic index (considered with the actual glycemic load) is generally accepted as a crucial component of healthy diets nowadays.
Continue reading ‘Review of the South Beach Diet’

An overview of the Zone Diet

Dr Barry Sears, a biochemist, first popularized the Zone diet in his 1995 book, “The Zone”. While this diet has not been developed specifically for weight loss, it is probably more well-known for its weight loss benefits than for any of the other advantages it promises, all thanks to solid media exposure. The popularity of this diet reached its peak in the late 1990s, slipped a bit, and then made a comeback recently following the endorsements of Hollywood A-listers and models such as Jennifer Aniston, Sarah Jessica Parker, Sandra Bullock and Cindy Crawford.

The Zone diet is often classified as a low-carb diet, but Dr Sears describes it as a moderate carb, moderate fat, and moderate protein diet, and regards it as superior to low-carb diets due to the improved hormonal responses. He goes on to say that the Zone diet can not be regarded as a protein rich diet since you never consume more low-fat protein during any meal than you can fit on the palm of your hand.

Many scientific studies are finding that weight management is a lot more complex than simply balancing calorie intake and calorie usage. The Zone approach suggests that inflammation precedes obesity. If that is true, any obesity problem can only be addressed by resolving the underlying inflammation.
Continue reading ‘An overview of the Zone Diet’

Long live the Atkins Diet….

One cannot help but be astounded by how easily and effectively government agencies, large food corporations and the media succeeded in leading us to believe that a particular view of our nutritional needs is indeed a fact of life. This subtle “brain washing” was (and still is to a large extend) so effective that it subconsciously impacts all of our decision making regarding our family’s nutritional needs. It is, in fact, ingrained in our very fabric of being.

With many of us still finding it extremely difficult to even consider the idea that a diet high in fat can be good for you, it is interesting to remember that the idea of a low-fat diet only really took hold in the 70’s. Up until then, the generally accepted wisdom was that fat and protein were the foundations of good nutrition, and that carbohydrates were responsible for making you fat! Of course the low-fat dogma turned this age old wisdom on its head and carbohydrates suddenly became the most important source of food depicted at the base of the famous Food Guide Pyramid!

Continue reading ‘Long live the Atkins Diet….’

The Mediterranean Diet?


So what exactly is all this fuss about the Mediterranean Diet? Everywhere you go, the topic comes up in discussions as the solution to all our weight problems. The name itself conjures up associations of lazy summer holidays, sumptuous food, wine and good friends. How can a diet like this not be extremely enjoyable?

In a recent study the Mediterranean type diet was compared head on to Low-Carb and Low-Fat type diets. It came out with flying colors. Average weight loss on the Mediterranean diet almost equaled that of Low-Carb diets, while most definitely offering a more varied and exciting menu. Most importantly; the range of implementation options and food groups this eating plan offers makes it much easier to permanently change to your everyday eating habits for sustained weight loss.

The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine (17 July 2008), found that participants in the Low-Carb group lost the most weight with a two year sustained average loss of 10.4 lb (4.7 kg). The group on the Mediterranean diet followed close on their heels with an average weight loss of 9.7 lb (4.4 kg). Interestingly, the average weight loss of those on the Low-Fat Diet was considerably lower at only 6.4 lb (2.9 kg). Women did better than men on the Mediterranean Diet, and the diet was also found to have definite general health benefits such as the prevention of Type II Diabetes and heart problems, as well as improved longevity.

Now that we know the Mediterranean diet warrants a closer look; what is it exactly?


Continue reading ‘The Mediterranean Diet?’