Archive for the 'Body' Category

What is starvation mode and how does it affect weight loss

Question: I have been told that when I eat too little, my body goes into starvation mode to protect itself, and that it will slow down my weight loss. Is this true and how can I avoid starvation mode?

Answer: Many weight loss coaches use the term “starvation mode” to describe your body’s natural response to protect itself when you don’t eat enough for extended periods. When you regularly eat too little food to provide your body with the necessary nutrients, it perceives itself to be in danger from starvation. Since your body is wonderfully designed to protect you, it will slow down your metabolism to conserve energy so it can keep vital organs such as the brain and the heart going for as long as possible in the face of the perceived threat. While it will burn fat for fuel, it will also start burning lean muscle mass for fuel, which will slow down your metabolism even further. People on starvation diets invariably find that they regain all the weight they’ve lost (and then some) very quickly as soon as they start eating again.

While a starvation diet may help you lose weight quite fast in the short term, you will pay a heavy price because you are setting yourself up for a lifetime of weight problems. Your metabolism gets progressively slower with each day you remain on a starvation diet. This resultant slower metabolism needs less fuel, so you consistently have to eat less and less to lose weight! As your metabolism slows down even further and your lean muscle mass dwindles you will also find that you become more and more tired. This in turn means you will get less exercise, which leaves you with less lean muscle, and an even slower metabolism. It really is a vicious cycle. The importance of protecting your lean muscle mass to boost your metabolism can not be stressed enough.

The question arises: when does your body go into starvation mode? As with anything that involves the human body, there is no one single answer that will be true for everyone. The levels at which starvation mode kicks in vary from person to person. What we can do though, is understand how it gets triggered so we can avoid getting our bodies in that state. Your decision of how much to eat should be based on your individual Total Daily Energy Requirements, which takes into account a variety of factors including height, weight, age, gender and activity levels. If you want to lose weight safely, without setting off the alarm bells in your body; aim to eat approximately 300 – 500 calories less than your total daily requirements. This will provide your body with enough fuel to keep it going comfortably, but will still create a sufficient caloric deficit to ensure that you lose weight. To protect your metabolism even further, make sure your diet contains enough protein and that you maintain / increase your activity levels.

Note. You will find that many experts advise you not to eat less than 1 200 calories per day to prevent starvation mode. This is just a general rule of thumb to provide advice in the absence of enough information. To be safe, get your individual Total Daily Energy Requirements calculated, and follow the advice above.

Does muscle really weigh more than fat

Question: I’ve often heard people say that muscle weighs more than fat. Can this explain why I haven’t lost so much weight since I started working out?

Answer: Well, yes and no. One pound of muscle and one pound of fat will both reflect a pound of weight on the scales, so in effect there is no difference between “fat weight” and “muscle weight”, as far as the scales go. But all pounds are not made equal. Muscle is more dense than fat; so a smaller volume of muscle will weigh the same as a larger volume of fat. So, if you have plenty of lean muscle mass, you may weigh as much or even more than someone with more fat, but you will be leaner. The other advantage of lean muscle mass over fat is of course that it increases your metabolic rate, which helps you lose weight, maintain your goal weight, and allow you to eat more without gaining weight. The reason for this is that while one pound of muscle burns about 6 calories per day, one pound of fat only burns 2 calories per day! The more lean muscle you have, the more calories you burn, even while you rest.

In light of the discussion above you may want to change your stated goal to start losing fat (or inches), instead of weight. The last thing you want to lose is lean muscle mass; which is exactly what you lose on the majority of popular crash diets. Follow a healthy and balanced diet with plenty of protein combined with a good exercise program, and boost your metabolism for permanent weight loss. For more information on the different diets see our diet reviews.