Tag Archive for 'total energy requirements'

What does it mean for my diet when they say calorie or kcal

Question: Okay, if 1 kCal equals 1000 calories, then my 20 oz cup of herbal tea is giving me 36000 calories?!? Heck, I might never eat or drink again if that’s the case! I think somebody entered something in wrong, either that or I’m missing something. Here I am thinking that I’m staying within my guidelines and I keep coming up with all these insane calorie counts! Help?

Answer: This is a fair question and it is easy to get confused on this since most diet websites do not stick to the scientific conventions and loosely talk about calories for convenience’s sake. Most often, whenever you see references to calories (or cal) in popular magazines or non-scientific websites, you can assume that they refer to kcal or kilogram calories. Some countries use food calories, where 1 food calorie is equal to 1kcal. 1 kcal (1000 calories) can also be indicated by using Cal, with a capital C, as opposed to cal. The average woman should consume approximately 2000 Cal (kcal) and the average man approximately 2500 Cal per day, so you are quite safe in having your herbal tea containing a mere 36 Cal.

Of course we all have different energy requirements. For more information on how this is calculated and how many calories you should consume to lose weight see this note on total energy requirements and our free weight loss tools
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What is starvation mode and how does it affect weight loss

Question: I have been told that when I eat too little, my body goes into starvation mode to protect itself, and that it will slow down my weight loss. Is this true and how can I avoid starvation mode?

Answer: Many weight loss coaches use the term “starvation mode” to describe your body’s natural response to protect itself when you don’t eat enough for extended periods. When you regularly eat too little food to provide your body with the necessary nutrients, it perceives itself to be in danger from starvation. Since your body is wonderfully designed to protect you, it will slow down your metabolism to conserve energy so it can keep vital organs such as the brain and the heart going for as long as possible in the face of the perceived threat. While it will burn fat for fuel, it will also start burning lean muscle mass for fuel, which will slow down your metabolism even further. People on starvation diets invariably find that they regain all the weight they’ve lost (and then some) very quickly as soon as they start eating again.

While a starvation diet may help you lose weight quite fast in the short term, you will pay a heavy price because you are setting yourself up for a lifetime of weight problems. Your metabolism gets progressively slower with each day you remain on a starvation diet. This resultant slower metabolism needs less fuel, so you consistently have to eat less and less to lose weight! As your metabolism slows down even further and your lean muscle mass dwindles you will also find that you become more and more tired. This in turn means you will get less exercise, which leaves you with less lean muscle, and an even slower metabolism. It really is a vicious cycle. The importance of protecting your lean muscle mass to boost your metabolism can not be stressed enough.

The question arises: when does your body go into starvation mode? As with anything that involves the human body, there is no one single answer that will be true for everyone. The levels at which starvation mode kicks in vary from person to person. What we can do though, is understand how it gets triggered so we can avoid getting our bodies in that state. Your decision of how much to eat should be based on your individual Total Daily Energy Requirements, which takes into account a variety of factors including height, weight, age, gender and activity levels. If you want to lose weight safely, without setting off the alarm bells in your body; aim to eat approximately 300 – 500 calories less than your total daily requirements. This will provide your body with enough fuel to keep it going comfortably, but will still create a sufficient caloric deficit to ensure that you lose weight. To protect your metabolism even further, make sure your diet contains enough protein and that you maintain / increase your activity levels.

Note. You will find that many experts advise you not to eat less than 1 200 calories per day to prevent starvation mode. This is just a general rule of thumb to provide advice in the absence of enough information. To be safe, get your individual Total Daily Energy Requirements calculated, and follow the advice above.